Author Topic: WANTED  (Read 8241 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline chrisb

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
WANTED
« on: June 08, 2011, 10:32:34 PM »
Wanted:

L. Coes "Key Model" large adjustable wrenches.  Looking for the 38" and 48" sizes (and the 72" if miracles do indeed occur!).
Thanks

Offline Papaw

  • Owner/Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11221
  • Alvin, Texas
    • Papawswrench
Re: WANTED
« Reply #1 on: June 08, 2011, 10:58:45 PM »
The 72" one would be a miracle for sure. The others might be found, but I hope your pockets are DEEP!
Member of PHARTS - Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society
 
 Flickr page- https://www.flickr.com/photos/nhankamer/

Offline chrisb

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Re: WANTED
« Reply #2 on: June 09, 2011, 08:39:54 AM »
That is true - they are not cheap.  I did luck out this past weekend and picked up the 32" model for $30.00 at a flea market.  Anyhow - my search continues!

Offline Papaw

  • Owner/Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11221
  • Alvin, Texas
    • Papawswrench
Re: WANTED
« Reply #3 on: June 09, 2011, 09:24:08 AM »
Quote
32" model for $30.00 at a flea market.

That qualifies as a major coup!
Member of PHARTS - Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society
 
 Flickr page- https://www.flickr.com/photos/nhankamer/

Offline chrisb

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Re: WANTED
« Reply #4 on: June 09, 2011, 04:54:27 PM »
Firstly - thanks for your comments and suggestions.  I do appreciate it.  A question for you please: What is your opinion on wire wheel cleaning of really rusty wrenches?  Thanks

Chris

Offline Papaw

  • Owner/Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 11221
  • Alvin, Texas
    • Papawswrench
Re: WANTED
« Reply #5 on: June 09, 2011, 08:08:21 PM »
I prefer to use the least invasive cleaning methods first. Wire wheeling is a method I use, but carefully and very lightly with the softest wire I can get.
Member of PHARTS - Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society
 
 Flickr page- https://www.flickr.com/photos/nhankamer/

Offline Wrenchmensch

  • Contributor
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1114
  • Wrenches tell of man's freedom to think
Re: WANTED
« Reply #6 on: June 09, 2011, 10:02:53 PM »
Re: wire wheel cleaning.

I use a soft steel wheel for removing rust from steel and malleable cast iron tools. I use a light touch so as not to cut through patinas that often lie under rust   I also use a Dremel-powered stainless steel brush to remove rust from nooks and crannies. I also have a brass wheel for shining up nickel-plated surfaces and taking off air-caused oxides from highly polished steel surfaces.  Finally, I use Johnson's Paste Wax to protect ferrous wrench surfaces and wooden handles.

You didn't ask, but I will clean dirty wooden handles of worthy wrenches with Murphy's Oil Soap, then do a light cleaning with 0000 steel wool, then wipe with mineral spirits.  I will then put on a coat of boiled linseed oil, and lightly steel wool that when dry. Then three coats of satin polyurethane are applied, each one lightly scratched with 0000 steel wool, then wiped with mineral spirits, when dry.  A coat of Johnson' wax is applied to complete wood handle restoration. Note: wood handles are generally worth restoring only if they are intact, e.g. not cracked or missing wood.

Two wrenches I have restored using the above methodologies are shown below.
« Last Edit: June 23, 2011, 09:38:28 PM by Wrenchmensch »

Offline chrisb

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 5
Re: WANTED
« Reply #7 on: June 10, 2011, 12:24:36 AM »
To Wrenchmensch:

Thanks for the guidance.  Fantastic pictures of the two wrenches - thank you for sharing those.

Offline 1930

  • Contributor
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2141
Re: WANTED
« Reply #8 on: June 10, 2011, 04:44:30 PM »
Quote.......You didn't ask, but I will clean dirty wooden handles of worthy wrenches with Murphy's Oil Soap, then do a light cleaning with 0000 steel wool, then wipe with mineral spirits.  I will then put on a coat of boiled linseed oil, and lightly steel wool that when dry. Then three coats of satin polyurethane are applied, each one lightly scratched with 0000 steel wool, then wiped with mineral spirits, when dry.  A coat of Johnson' wax is applied to complete wood handle restoration. Note: wood handles are generally worth restoring only if they are intact, e.g. not cracked or missing wood.


W.M. My father used this method or very similar, unfortunately I did not pay any attention so I have to ask, Boiled linseed oil, I honestly can almost smell it now, if I remember right it is a watery subsatnce, do you literally boil a certain amount before application, what is the purpose of this?
Always looking for what interests me, anything early Dodge Brothers/Graham Brothers trucks ( pre 1932 or so ) and slant six / Super six parts.

Offline Wrenchmensch

  • Contributor
  • Hero Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1114
  • Wrenches tell of man's freedom to think
Re: WANTED
« Reply #9 on: June 10, 2011, 09:34:56 PM »
Being a simple soul, I go to the store and buy a can of "Boiled Linseed Oil".  This product is a standard paint store/section item, located on the shelf next to Linseed Oil, Turpentine, Mineral Spirits, et cetera.

Boiling linseed oil at home is is too dangerous.  A key difference between boiled and unboiled linseed oil, is that boiled oil has driers in it.

Offline Branson

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3643
Re: WANTED
« Reply #10 on: June 11, 2011, 07:45:55 AM »
Boiling linseed oil at home is is too dangerous.  A key difference between boiled and unboiled linseed oil, is that boiled oil has driers in it.

Driers really are the key.  On the other hand, boiling linseed oil shouldn't be any more dangerous than boiling any other vegetable oil.  It's used as a cooking oil in some countries.

Offline rusty

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4345
Re: WANTED
« Reply #11 on: June 11, 2011, 01:16:58 PM »
>Driers really are the key

Driers are all there is, boiled linseed oil hasn't been boiled since before WWII ; P

The driers are not edible however, so you can not eat boiled linseed oil, and you should not put it on things like salid spoons....

The only purpose for originally boiling it was to modify it chemically into a form that dries somewhat faster...(linseed oil dries by oxidising, the boiling process partially oxidises it, the driers are catalysts that cause the oxidation to occur faster)
Obviously, if you have added something that makes it dry faster, there is no point in boiling it to partly pre-dry it...

Just a weathered light rust/WD40 mix patina.

Offline 300man

  • Newbie
  • *
  • Posts: 2
Re: WANTED
« Reply #12 on: February 08, 2024, 04:54:12 PM »
I know this is a old ad but was wondering...chrisb did you ever find the 38 and 48 inch Coes Key Wrenches you were seeking?

How rare are they?