Author Topic: Hand Planes  (Read 351348 times)

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Offline Art Rafael

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #135 on: January 07, 2014, 12:36:30 PM »
Oh.  That is nice.  I'm tempted to bid on that one -- we'll see.   There are enough pictures that I could probably build a miniature from that.  Ralph

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #136 on: January 07, 2014, 02:02:01 PM »
Oh.  That is nice.  I'm tempted to bid on that one -- we'll see.   There are enough pictures that I could probably build a miniature from that.  Ralph

I'll most certainly be looking forward to seeing it Ralph!!

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Offline johnsironsanctuary

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #137 on: January 07, 2014, 03:27:30 PM »
I have a miniature horn plane that was on a dollar table. About 4 inches long. The horn is missing. Gotta find it now. Hmmmm.........I know it's here somewhere.
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Offline Art Rafael

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #138 on: January 07, 2014, 08:40:31 PM »
I'd love to see it -- from every angle.  Ralph

Offline Branson

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #139 on: January 08, 2014, 07:22:37 AM »
Something like this probably.

Exactly like this.  Uses a "horn" rather than a knob.

Offline scottg

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #140 on: January 08, 2014, 12:35:38 PM »
Here is a better listing of a horn plane Ralph

  The classier planes have a little "ducks butt" to catch the crotch of your thumb, to push against. 
  And the horn is not really straight. It curls around your hand a little.
     http://www.ebay.com/itm/A-outstanding-ULMIA-GERMAN-GERMANY-horn-plane-45mm-scrub-dovetail-/201013890228?pt=LH_DefaultDomain_0&hash=item2ecd5c8cb4
  yours Scott

Offline Art Rafael

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #141 on: January 08, 2014, 01:13:54 PM »
Oh nice.  Thanks Scott.  I can see that there is no set standard for wood type, and even body style can vary some.  That will give me some freedom to give one my own artistic flair (within reason).

Ralph

Offline johnsironsanctuary

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #142 on: January 08, 2014, 02:17:59 PM »
I found this interesting. I did not know that you pulled the plane.

http://pfollansbee.wordpress.com/tag/scrub-plane/
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Offline johnsironsanctuary

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #143 on: January 08, 2014, 08:12:03 PM »
OK Ralph, here is my little horn plane. It is not really a miniature, it's more the size of a block plane.  The poor little guy has had a rough life.  I think that the wood is beech.  There is no sign of a makers mark, but for a shop built tool, it was done by a craftsman.  The blade is forge welded and there is a little decorative groove down each side.  The steel sole is nailed on. I may kill a bladeless molding plane and make him a new little horn.  The crack can be epoxied and he may get a brass bolt through the toe. Scottg, how would osage orange work and look as a horn?



















« Last Edit: January 08, 2014, 08:24:56 PM by johnsironsanctuary »
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #144 on: January 08, 2014, 11:06:05 PM »
Wow John!  What do you think caused that crack?  It looks like a nice weekend project in the shop bringing that plane back to life.  If you decide to invest some time into fixing it, can you post a few more pictures of the finished product?  Thanks.

Jim C.
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Offline johnsironsanctuary

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #145 on: January 09, 2014, 07:53:28 AM »
I suspect that the wedge is just a little too wide and the stress from the horn dovetail teamed up to cause the crack. The size of the plane is also a factor. Less area = less strength.
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #146 on: January 09, 2014, 08:41:30 AM »
I suspect that the wedge is just a little too wide and the stress from the horn dovetail teamed up to cause the crack. The size of the plane is also a factor. Less area = less strength.

That makes sense John.  I know I asked for pictures of the "finished product" if you decide to fix the plane.  If it's not too much to ask, maybe you could add a post with a little writeup and a few pictures, showing the process you went through to fix it.  I'd be interested and I think others would be too.

Jim C. 
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Offline Branson

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #147 on: January 09, 2014, 10:14:16 AM »
I found this interesting. I did not know that you pulled the plane.

Well, you *can* pull it -- just like you *can* pull a Stanley #5 or a block plane.  And sometimes you have to pull the things.  But the only planes that are *designed * to be pulled are the Japanese planes.  And tat isn't for some mystical reason -- traditionally, Japanese carpenters did not work at a bench, but worked sitting on the floor.  All the horn planes I've played with are bench planes, and the older ones have horns that twist slightly to the left for the left hand to wrap around nicely while pushing.

Offline Branson

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #148 on: January 09, 2014, 10:42:11 AM »
Wow John!  What do you think caused that crack? 
Jim C.

There's the crack at the front, and another crack at the rear, and the wood body is fitted with a metal sole.  Both cracks look like the wood shrank back from the metal sole to me.  What I think caused these cracks was making the body out of pretty near to green wood, which shrank considerably as it finally dried.  If the wedge were tight enough to do that kind of damage, the fellow who made it (and it's definitely shop made) would have trimmed it to fit immediately as it wouldn't have gone in at all. 

Offline Art Rafael

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #149 on: January 09, 2014, 11:35:48 AM »
WOW!!! really, John.  That is a Beauty. 
It reflects pride and character just as it is, demonstrating, like an old carpenter, miles and miles and years and years of service.
I see that the iron blade has had a sliver of harder steel forge welded to form the cutting edge; that is ancient.
And the metal sole may have been added as a repair or as a preventative measure to keep it from falling into further disrepair so that this old man could render another 100k miles.
This plane demonstrates, in a most literally Romantic way, the essence of carpentry and the timeless nature of creativity.
It is a real relic and trophy as it is and deserves to be not stashed away but prominently and proudly displayed without cosmetic intervention that would conceal the story that it now tells.
If I could build one that looked as great as this one now does , it would take another 100 years of fine work.
Some old tools can and should be restored for continued service.  But this old man's beauty is in the story that the lines across it's face tell. 


I refer you to the song by Brandi Carlile for The story.


http://youtu.be/o8pQLtHTPaI
« Last Edit: January 09, 2014, 11:59:14 AM by Art Rafael »