Author Topic: Hand Planes  (Read 256801 times)

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Offline Chillylulu

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #60 on: December 23, 2013, 12:03:35 PM »
More pictures... not sure what happened. ?.. 
I'm sure I'll get the gang of this soon.

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #61 on: December 23, 2013, 01:30:44 PM »
Chillylulu,

That looks like an NOS plane if I ever saw one.  Just running it over a piece of pine a few times really doesn't devalue the plane from a collector's standpoint.  If the iron still has the original factory grind on it, pristine unaltered finishes are present over 99% of the plane, and it retains all of its original parts, the plane is still NOS in my book. 

As for the box, well, you saw the box that came with the #6C I posted above.  It was a little beat up, but still mostly intact.  Mint condition boxes certainly add to the value of an old tool.  More often than not however, the box, while damaged, is probably the main reason for the tool's amazing condition many decades later.  It takes the abuse while protecting the tool inside.  I have fair number of planes in their original boxes, but only a handful of those boxes are truly gem mint examples.  Paper and cardboard boxes containing relatively heavy items, in a shop environment, usually don't hold up too well over a long period of years, unless there was a conscious decision by the tool's owner to handle the box with care.  If a tool was used frequently, in and out of the box, over time, the boxes usually self destructed.  When looking for old planes, even user quality planes, I'm always drawn to those in a box.  I always hope to open the box and find a tool that was never used.  Usually that's not the case.  Still, the very existence of the box tells me that the prior owner valued the tool, and consequently thought enough of the tool to protect it in its box.  Based on my experience, a "user" tool in a box is usually in better condition than the same tool from the same era that was not stored in a box.  Maybe we'll talk more about boxes in a future post.

That's a great looking, NOS, collector quality plane.  Thanks for the pictures! 

Jim C.
« Last Edit: December 23, 2013, 04:43:31 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline Branson

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #62 on: December 24, 2013, 10:11:27 AM »
A lot of discussions I've read have not nice things to say about the Handyman planes.  I think, though, they're just a bit too fussy.  I'm putting a Handyman smooth plane back in order for a friend, and while it doesn't have all the bells and whistles of a Stanley #4 it seems to be a decent tool, and much of it uses good Stanley parts.  I'm sure he'll get good use out of it.  I'm to the point of sharpening the blade now.
The end of the cap iron of this plane  is painted red -- when was this done on Handymans?  Anybody know?

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #63 on: December 24, 2013, 02:56:27 PM »
A lot of discussions I've read have not nice things to say about the Handyman planes.  I think, though, they're just a bit too fussy.  I'm putting a Handyman smooth plane back in order for a friend, and while it doesn't have all the bells and whistles of a Stanley #4 it seems to be a decent tool, and much of it uses good Stanley parts.  I'm sure he'll get good use out of it.  I'm to the point of sharpening the blade now.
The end of the cap iron of this plane  is painted red -- when was this done on Handymans?  Anybody know?

Hey Branson,

You're right about the Handyman planes.  They were an economy line of planes offered by Stanley marketed directly to........  "The Home Handyman." Hence the name of the line of planes I guess.  Stanley was famous for trying to fill EVERY niche in the marketplace, real or imagined.  Still, Chillylulu's plane is in amazing condition for its age, and most certainly considered collector quality.  It's a nice plane just for its historic value alone.  As for the red paint on the cap iron, well, I don't know the answer to that one.  I'll do a little checking to see if I can find out. 

Jim C.
« Last Edit: December 24, 2013, 02:59:32 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline Chillylulu

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #64 on: December 24, 2013, 06:09:46 PM »
I wasn't sure if I was overpaying $20.00 + 3.00 commission. I liked it so I got it.

My first plane that I bought was an old Stanley 4C.  I have a friend who owns a blade sharpening business. He trued the plane up the first time for me. Its been smooth as silk ever since. The plane was used, I think I paid $45 for it 20 yrs ago. It was a lot less than new at the time.

It seems to me that plane prices have come down from where they were 15 yrs ago.  Is that at all accurate, or was I just looking in all the wrong places?

Chilly

Offline scottg

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #65 on: December 24, 2013, 06:44:16 PM »
 The antiques and collectible world is filled to the brim with people making up their own rules and price structures from the seat of their pants.
  Sometimes its very good for us.
 Sometimes its part of our "education".
 And nobody gets an education completely for free.
 
  I once saw a large shelf full of planes at an antique shop. All were priced at $25 each.
All were complete dogs, except one.
 Sheltons and unmarked and lowest grade hardware brands. Recently manufactured planes and missing parts planes and rusted to bits planes. Broken and missing wood handles planes. All the usual things that make a plane a true dog.

  But sitting there in the middle of the shelf was a Stanley #85 scraper plane in very near mint condition. All were priced the same.
  I was shaking as I reached for it. I picked it up ever so softly and hugged it to my chest, cradling it like it was a newborn child, and began moving deliberately toward the front of the store with a razor sharp eye to my footing.  Locked down concentration until I knew for sure it was safe. 
 

  Want to know how many dogs I bought before I knew that 85 was special?
  Want to see my "boneyard" of foolish decisions and well meaning gifts from others?
 Education takes time. It takes work and experience.

  There is nothing wrong with a Handyman plane in superb condition as a collectible. Especially with a decent box. Better a shelf queen though. While you can make a lesser plane work, with labor, it will never perform as well as an example from the best periods of plane manufacture.

 The more you know the better you will be able to separate the wheat from the chaff at a glance.   
   I scored a near mint Millers Falls #4 from the golden period of Millers (2 part lever cap) for a 10 spot this summer at a yard sale.
  I left three other planes priced at even less, where they sat, on the table.
 
  Education takes time and work and study.  Nobody gets it overnight for free. We pay up front.
           yours Scott

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #66 on: December 24, 2013, 10:38:36 PM »
^^^^^^ Pretty much what Scott says.  I'd say that's right on point.^^^^^^^

« Last Edit: December 24, 2013, 10:41:29 PM by Jim C. »
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Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #67 on: December 25, 2013, 04:11:55 PM »
Merry Christmas!!

Jim C.
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Offline johnsironsanctuary

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #68 on: December 25, 2013, 04:55:36 PM »
Merry Christmas to all! A special Thank You to Jimc for starting this thread. I have learned a bit about planes and enjoyed it thoroughly. Thanks again Jim.
Top monkey of the monkey wrench clan

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #69 on: December 25, 2013, 10:35:43 PM »
Merry Christmas to all! A special Thank You to Jimc for starting this thread. I have learned a bit about planes and enjoyed it thoroughly. Thanks again Jim.

I appreciate your kind words John.  Thank you.  I'll keep looking for interesting hand plane content to post here.

Jim C.
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Offline OilyRascal

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #70 on: December 25, 2013, 11:28:32 PM »
Thank you, Jim C.  This is a perfect example of the content that keeps me addicted to this forum.  My hat is off to you for your commitment to tools, the yearn for knowledge, and the desire to share!
"FORGED IN THE USA" myself.  Be good to your tools!

Garden and Yard Rustfinder Extraordinaire!
http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?topic=3717

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #71 on: December 26, 2013, 02:32:15 PM »
Thank you, Jim C.  This is a perfect example of the content that keeps me addicted to this forum.  My hat is off to you for your commitment to tools, the yearn for knowledge, and the desire to share!

You know, when I add posts to this thread, I frequently ask myself a few questions like, "I wonder if anyone is reading this stuff, and if so, is it having any impact on them?  Is it interesting?  Is it informative?  Does it make sense?  Is the information accurate?" Well, I'm very appreciative for receiving positive feedback, so thank you!  It makes me think that I must be hitting the mark at least some of the time.  I'll try to keep you coming back for more.

Jim C.         
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Offline Lewill2

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #72 on: December 26, 2013, 02:51:13 PM »
Well with 970 some views and 72 replies you must be getting somebodies interest, including me.

Offline Jim C.

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #73 on: December 26, 2013, 03:35:13 PM »
Well with 970 some views and 72 replies you must be getting somebodies interest, including me.

The numbers may be a little misleading.  Of the 970 some views here, about 900 of them are probably just me looking to see if anyone is reading this stuff!!  Anyway, I'm already planning my next "featured hand plane" post, so check back in.  Thanks.

Jim C.   
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Offline Branson

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Re: Hand Planes
« Reply #74 on: December 27, 2013, 07:10:27 AM »
The numbers may be a little misleading.  Of the 970 some views here, about 900 of them are probably just me looking to see if anyone is reading this stuff!!  Anyway, I'm already planning my next "featured hand plane" post, so check back in.  Thanks.
Jim C.

Well, some of them are me, checking them out again (and again).  Those count.  Your posts are worth revisiting!  Now waiting for the next installment.