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Hand Planes

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Jim C.:
Link to Hand Planes Thread Index-  http://www.papawswrench.com/vboard/index.php?topic=10243.0;topicseen

I like hand planes.  They're fascinating tools, having many diverse patterns and functions that are absolutely invaluable to those who enjoy woodworking.  Planes can be used in just about every aspect of working with wood.  They can be set so precisely as to remove a shaving that's nearly transparent and floats (not falls) to the ground, or they can hog off material and dimension stock better than no other hand tool.  A plane can fine tune a joint to create a seamless union between parts and will leave a sheen on the surface of a work piece that cannot be replicated mechanically or otherwise.  Yes, I like hand planes.  I use them, I collect them, and I enjoy learning about them.  To those who already know the utility and pleasure of using planes out in the shop, then I hope you'll join in the conversation.  To those who are thinking about using that old plane left to them by a loved one, or simply the plane they picked up at a flea market for a couple bucks, I hope you'll be inspired to give it a try.

Stanley #4: 

Stanley started making the #4 in 1869 and is probably still making some version of this plane today, although I suspect that the earlier models, made prior to 1950, were superior in overall fit, finish and quality.  The #4 is most likely one of the, or the most popular, and useful planes ever produced.  So successful that it has scarcely changed in design or appearance in all of its years of existence.  Its size and weight make it suitable for a number of tasks to include smoothing, fitting, finish work, and general carpentry, all depending on the user's personal preferences and the project at hand.  The #4 is commonly found at garage sales, flea markets, and online.  They're relatively inexpensive and should be in EVERY woodworker's arsenal of tools.  Even the DIYer should own one of these, and know how sharpen the iron, tune it up and use it efficiently and effectively.

The plane depicted below is a Stanley #4 with a smooth sole.  It's a Type 16, produced between 1933 and 1941.     

Papaw:
Great post, Jim!
Are you going to continue to educate those of us not so educated on planes?

Jim C.:

--- Quote from: Papaw on October 04, 2013, 09:40:57 AM ---Great post, Jim!
Are you going to continue to educate those of us not so educated on planes?

--- End quote ---

I'm hardly the hand plane expert, and would more likely categorize myself as an enthusiastic user and collector.  The best education one can receive is usually self imposed.  If this thread acts as a catalyst for that curious individual to take the next step, then that's great.

Art Rafael:
Hi, Jim C.

I too like hand planes and find them fascinating.  Some would say that I am obsessed with hand planes -- just because I try to build miniature versions of some that I have seen and like.  I have learned how to really appreciate a part as simple as a lever cap by building some in 1/4 scale.  And I have looked at frogs from both sides now - from up and down, and now, somehow, I really understand how frogs work and how to build one.  But I really don't know enough about hand planes at all.  There is so much to know about the #4 alone, let alone the great variety that have been produced throughout history.  Thank you for sharing your views on my favorite (also), the #4. 

Ralph 

RedVise:

--- Quote from: Jim C. on October 03, 2013, 10:24:29 PM ---  Even the DIYer should own one of these, and know how sharpen the iron, tune it up and use it efficiently and effectively.
       

--- End quote ---

I have seen this expression before, tuning a plane, would like to know the basics.

Thanks

Brian

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