Author Topic: buck bros, framing hammer  (Read 5210 times)

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Offline amertrac

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buck bros, framing hammer
« on: April 22, 2012, 06:45:38 AM »
I dug up an old buck brothers framing hammer steel all the way through the handle . It has a metal plate on the end of the handle that looks like two rivets holding the handle on. the rivets look like they are part of the square metal that is through the handle . the comfort part of the handle is missing. Is it worth a new handle. how does one replace the rivets after they have been ground down enough to get the plate off
 and is there a cover for the plate for cosmetic reasons I believe it is a 16 oz
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Offline john k

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Re: buck bros, framing hammer
« Reply #1 on: April 22, 2012, 09:09:27 AM »
I have one like that in  very similar condition.  The disintegrating handle is made of leather disks.  About the only way to un-rivet the ends is either destroy the plate, or grind off the rivets.  The latter would be better because who is going to notice the handle being 1/4 in. shorter.  Just cutting, stacking, compressing, and gluing the leather disks would be tedious to me. 
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Offline amertrac

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Re: buck bros, framing hammer
« Reply #2 on: April 22, 2012, 10:07:46 AM »
I agree, with most hammer if the handle is bad you just replace or keep just the head in your collection . This piece pardon the expression (looks like he--) It certianly is not going into my inventory .
      bob w. 
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Offline Dakota Woodworker

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Re: buck bros, framing hammer
« Reply #3 on: April 22, 2012, 10:15:27 AM »
I have repaired Estwing leather handled hammers by carefully grinding off the rivets that hold the butt plate on then grinding the two posts that form the rivets on the end of the steel frame a little longer. I then took the leather disks from an old donor hammer and replaced the damaged or missing discs on the one being repaired.  You have to compress the leathers up the handle as much as possible before replacing the butt plate.  The hammer I repaired is used frequently in the shop now and is still holding together after several years.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2012, 07:50:27 PM by Dakota Woodworker »
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Offline kxxr

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Re: buck bros, framing hammer
« Reply #4 on: April 22, 2012, 02:39:31 PM »
Seems like a good place for a picture of a hammer I rescued that was no doubt very near it's final resting place. I will resurrect it if I can and hopefully, one day, have a picture of it in better shape. Even if I don't get that far, I will most certainly pound a few nails with it, just because.
Thanks for the hints.


Offline scottg

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Re: buck bros, framing hammer
« Reply #5 on: April 23, 2012, 02:15:21 PM »
Making the leather is easy.  Punch an oblong hole in a small rectangle and press it on. You trim it to the form fitting oval last, after all else is done.

  I really wish Estwing leather handle hammers were more cherished by the tool public.
 (Eddie made this hammer whatever name is on it)
 
 To repair a leather handle effectively, especially when a substantial part of the leather is gone,
 would require a custom clamp to do a good job.

 I would endeavor to make said clamp, except repairing inexpensive yard sale hammers isn't likely to pay much.
  If they were suddenly being scarfed up fast by collectors, at $250 apiece,  I'd go for it.
  yours Scott

Offline rusty

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Re: buck bros, framing hammer
« Reply #6 on: April 23, 2012, 06:06:13 PM »

I have one in back that the leather has dried up and shrunk, it's all there , but it slides around on the hammer. Not a good feeling when swinging a hammer, so I havn't used it.

Would neats foot oil or something swell the leather back up? or is it just shrunk and dead?
Just a weathered light rust/WD40 mix patina.

Offline Branson

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Re: buck bros, framing hammer
« Reply #7 on: April 24, 2012, 07:32:31 AM »
  I really wish Estwing leather handle hammers were more cherished by the tool public.
  yours Scott

Me too.  I have a geologists hammer like this, in really good shape, and I found a 14 oz claw hammer at a flea market a couple of years ago for not much money that lives in one of the kitchen drawers.   I need another claw hammer like I need another hole in my head, but I just couldn't walk away from it.  The leather is pretty rough, but not loose.  Wonder if a good saddle soaping would help...

I like the hatchets, too.  My grandfather's Estwing was the first hatchet I ever used, and I have very fond memories of those leather handles.

Offline scottg

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Re: buck bros, framing hammer
« Reply #8 on: April 24, 2012, 11:37:07 AM »
  The leather is pretty rough, but not loose.  Wonder if a good saddle soaping would help...
I like the hatchets, too.  My grandfather's Estwing was the first hatchet I ever used, and I have very fond memories of those leather handles.

  Leather can be sanded just like wood. In fact, this is how they make them in the first place!
Wax at the end.
This knife is 1/2 new leather and 1/2 old. 

 I really like the Estwing belt ax too.  I keep looking for a good one.
Of course I need another belt ax like a hole in the head too. heeheheh
  yours Scott
 
« Last Edit: April 24, 2012, 11:40:10 AM by scottg »