Author Topic: The quiet heroes of World War II  (Read 2070 times)

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Offline Shaman

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The quiet heroes of World War II
« on: March 26, 2021, 03:37:20 AM »
The history of aviation is littered with examples of successes achieved through adaptability, improvisation, and overcoming obstacles. One of the iron rules of aviation is that without trained technicians and mechanics, an aircraft cannot fly safely. Often the silent heroes, the mechanics and ground crew repeatedly had to work under adverse conditions: whether hearing of nearby armored battles on the Eastern Front, finding themselves under constant fire in the hot deserts of North Africa, or in the cramped and cold hangar of an escort carrier near the Arctic.

The most important maintenance document for any British military aircraft was and still is today, the Form 700. While in the beginning, it is indeed just a sheet of paper, by the beginning of World War II each aircraft's Form 700 was already the thickness of a binder. Among the many pieces of information contained in this form were service history, component wear, oil and fuel consumption, and maintenance dates. This document was later signed by the pilot before take-off and after landing - if the plane returned damaged, the pilot was sometimes reprimanded by a senior mechanic for damaging "his" machine.

And when it came to recruiting and training mechanic crews, rules and training programs varied from nation to nation. For example, the Royal Navy's Fleet Air Arm, in keeping with the Royal Navy, developed a two-track solution. The majority of personnel came from the Naval Air Mechanic line, while higher qualifications were held by Artificers.

Mechanics initially underwent five weeks of training common to all Royal Navy recruits. After that, they were divided into the following specialties: engine mechanic, electrician, armored, and airframe mechanic.

Offline papadan

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Re: The quiet heroes of World War II
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2021, 04:17:24 AM »
interesting read, don't stop now Shaman. Oh and welcome to Tool Talk.
VWs to D10s, I've fixed em.
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Offline d42jeep

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Re: The quiet heroes of World War II
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2021, 11:10:36 AM »
Now where did I put that roll of duct tape?
-Don
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Offline papadan

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Re: The quiet heroes of World War II
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2021, 11:47:20 AM »
Now where did I put that roll of duct tape?
-Don

Ain't that the truth!
VWs to D10s, I've fixed em.
Member of PHARTS-  Perfect Handle Admiration, Restoration and Torturing Society

Offline p_toad

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Re: The quiet heroes of World War II
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2021, 11:23:43 PM »
interesting info Shaman.   welcome to the forums.   :smiley: