Author Topic: Cleaning Combination Squares  (Read 2801 times)

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Offline gibsontool

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Re: Cleaning Combination Squares
« Reply #15 on: February 03, 2020, 09:39:14 PM »
A few years ago I got several hand saw (5 or 6) and 4 framing squares that were all rusted up.I took a sheet of plywood and nailed some 2x4:s to it, layed it on the floor of my shop and spread a layer of poly over it, put the squares and the saws ( with handles removed ) in it and poured vinegar over them. This worked out quite well until I tried to get the vinegar back into a container. I had put the 2x4's down on the flat side and when I tried to raise one end so I could scoop out the vinegar the majority of it ended up all over the floor. If I were to do this again I think if the 2x4's were on edge it would be a lot easier to clean up. 

Offline Yadda

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Re: Cleaning Combination Squares
« Reply #16 on: February 05, 2020, 06:52:21 AM »
What the heck is it about framing squares that attracts paint?
People store them next to bench planes, which are well-known paint magnets.

My question is how to soak them? I considered using a large trash bag, but it would take a lot of vinegar.  I'm considering wrapping them in cheap paper towels and soaking the paper towels in vinegar, then wrapping it in plastic wrap.
No experience, but maybe get one of those big flat mixing tubs that people mix concrete and soil amendments in?  Like this:


Get it as close to level as you can, then pour in vinegar until it covers the square.

I had not considered the plane, square proximity connection, it is all much clearer now.  :grin:

The mixing tub is another good option.  Thanks!
You might say I have a tool collecting problem....

Offline Berryb

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Re: Cleaning Combination Squares
« Reply #17 on: February 05, 2020, 10:34:11 AM »
Knife guys taught me to go after rust with a lead pencil first. It goes after the rust without taking away any metal or scratching up the surface. I try it on everything first now, and rarely feel the need to go any deeper. for larger surfaces I use a wide carpenters pencil and then rub it off with a rag. At first I used the eraser end to rub it off but the pencil end outlasts the eraser, just like in grade school.
Bruce

Offline Bill Houghton

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Re: Cleaning Combination Squares
« Reply #18 on: February 05, 2020, 11:26:17 AM »
Knife guys taught me to go after rust with a lead pencil first. It goes after the rust without taking away any metal or scratching up the surface. I try it on everything first now, and rarely feel the need to go any deeper. for larger surfaces I use a wide carpenters pencil and then rub it off with a rag. At first I used the eraser end to rub it off but the pencil end outlasts the eraser, just like in grade school.
Bruce
Interesting.  I suppose the (fired) clay in the "lead" is a microabrasive, lubricated by the graphite.  I wonder if harder pencils work better?

Offline Northwoods

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Re: Cleaning Combination Squares
« Reply #19 on: February 05, 2020, 02:20:03 PM »
Knife guys taught me to go after rust with a lead pencil first. It goes after the rust without taking away any metal or scratching up the surface. I try it on everything first now, and rarely feel the need to go any deeper. for larger surfaces I use a wide carpenters pencil and then rub it off with a rag. At first I used the eraser end to rub it off but the pencil end outlasts the eraser, just like in grade school.
Bruce
Interesting.  I suppose the (fired) clay in the "lead" is a microabrasive, lubricated by the graphite.  I wonder if harder pencils work better?
Good thinking!
The ORIGINAL Northwoods.

Offline Yadda

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Re: Cleaning Combination Squares
« Reply #20 on: February 05, 2020, 08:06:50 PM »
Knife guys taught me to go after rust with a lead pencil first. It goes after the rust without taking away any metal or scratching up the surface. I try it on everything first now, and rarely feel the need to go any deeper. for larger surfaces I use a wide carpenters pencil and then rub it off with a rag. At first I used the eraser end to rub it off but the pencil end outlasts the eraser, just like in grade school.
Bruce

It will take several large pencils to work on those framing squares.  I have some small squares. This may be a very good option for those small squares.
You might say I have a tool collecting problem....