Author Topic: stanley no. 81-050 honing guide  (Read 6489 times)

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Offline amertrac

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stanley no. 81-050 honing guide
« on: September 22, 2011, 06:09:23 AM »
Found this in the depths of oblivian under me desk. checked out on internet that it has been discontinued . woodworkers would not buy them? they did not work well ? replaced by newer product?  inquring mind wants to know.  bob w.
TO SOON ULD UND TO LATE SCHMART

Offline rusty

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Re: stanley no. 81-050 honing guide
« Reply #1 on: September 22, 2011, 07:10:42 PM »

They have been waiting 30 years for you to send back the customer satisfaction survey card so they would know if it was a good product or not.....

The (very) few folks that I know of that actully bother to sharpen irons seem to all think the guides are silly if you know how to do it by hand with a plain old stone and some spit....

So...I suppose marketing at Stanley finally tripped over the precipice on that one..
Just a weathered light rust/WD40 mix patina.

Offline Branson

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Re: stanley no. 81-050 honing guide
« Reply #2 on: September 22, 2011, 08:59:06 PM »
Stanley had other models as well.   I bought one 30 odd years ago because it looked like the very thing.  I used it about twice.  The style you seem to have is still manufactured, but if you really want to get all CDO about it, you can spend $109.99 at:

http://www.woodcraft.com/Product/2020080/19122/Pinnacle-Honing-Guide.aspx?refcode=10INBING

Scrolling down the page shows a couple of other designs, one like the version I bought all those years ago.  Me, I do it with water or oil, depending on the stone, and by hand.  Mind you, I'm not as fussy as some folks, but i do pretty good.

Offline rusty

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Re: stanley no. 81-050 honing guide
« Reply #3 on: September 22, 2011, 10:14:41 PM »
> Mind you, I'm not as fussy as some folks

What, you didn't also get the granite surface plate so you can measure how many iron atoms remain to be ground off? LOL

That is quite a gadget tho, they seem to have incorporated every possible feature into it...

If you can't sharpen an iron with that thing, it is time to seriously consider a new career as a balloon inflator....
« Last Edit: September 22, 2011, 10:16:29 PM by rusty »
Just a weathered light rust/WD40 mix patina.

Offline scottg

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Re: stanley no. 81-050 honing guide
« Reply #4 on: September 23, 2011, 11:41:15 AM »
It was on the market too soon!
 It came and went before the fad came on.

  Nowdays, there are a legion of guys are using elaborate jigs and expensive stones and equipment and polishing blades out to 20,000 grit. Rubbing and rubbing they spend hours on a single blade. 
Most of them don't really cut any wood, or if they do its mostly for test purposes.

 I know a guy who mirror polishes blades out to the atom, and then photographs the edges with a microscopic camera and then tests the edges to the tune of 4 or 5 hundred full length shavings (from a 6" plank)
  to rephotograph and record the edge retention/degradation.
 One time he asked me, "Can your edges do this?"
   I answered, "I don't know. I spend about 2 minutes resharpening a plane blade and if I had to make 4 hundred test cuts I'd kill myself. 

 Its has become a national obsession. Its an entire hobby of sharpening steel.
So many newbies and wanna-be's are insecure about their ability to sharpen a simple edge tool,  that sharpening equipment has eclipsed all other woodworking tool sales.
 And its growing. Guy are paying hundreds of dollars for a single sharpening stone. The Japanese are catering to this insecurity and the Yuppie-puppy syndrome of one upsmanship in price, with "designer" label goods and 10 times the asking price.


  Me, I make things from wood.   I make tools themselves, and I make other things.
 I can get a comfortable shave from any edge tool in 2 minutes or less time, and its a plenty good enough edge to let me work in the hardest woods.
 But then, I was already working wood before much of the current crop was born or certainly ever know what a plane was.
 
 I had a jig almost just like the Stanley shown, once.
  I used it when I was first starting, in the 60's.  It worked, but it took too long.
 I started sharpening freehand, got better at it, and never went back.
  yours Scott 

Offline Branson

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Re: stanley no. 81-050 honing guide
« Reply #5 on: September 23, 2011, 07:07:51 PM »
Sure case of CDO.  Precision obsession variety.  I knew a hobbiest blacksmith who kept a magnet to test for proper welding temp.  For a lot of them it's all about the mystique.  For the old pharts, it was about earning a living, and working fast enough to make money.  The time spent in producing micron edges ... well, the old pharts would have spent that time making things and a living.

Offline scottg

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Re: stanley no. 81-050 honing guide
« Reply #6 on: September 24, 2011, 02:44:49 PM »
Here is one of the floor sweepings when I was making the baby bed.
Freehand honed edges aren't so bad..........
  yours Scott

Offline Jim C.

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Re: stanley no. 81-050 honing guide
« Reply #7 on: September 24, 2011, 07:52:08 PM »
I never tried one of those sharpening jigs.  I suppose they'd work okay.  I usually just sharpen plane irons and chisels free hand.  I do most of my sharpening on a slab of scrap granite.  The granite came from a kitchen sink cut-out.  With some spray adhesive, I glue down a few different grits of sandpaper to the granite.  Then, starting from about 220 grit and finishing at 2000 grit, with a little water for lubricant, I can get a pretty good edge.  If I'm starting with a relatively straight edge, the whole process takes about five to ten minutes.  Simple honing takes a little less once I've got the edge profile and bevel the way I want it.   If I get a plane with a really bad iron, I usually just start from scratch and re-shape the profile and bevel on a slow speed grinder.

Jim C.   
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Offline skipskip

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Re: stanley no. 81-050 honing guide
« Reply #8 on: September 24, 2011, 08:36:41 PM »
If you can't sharpen an iron with that thing, it is time to seriously consider a new career as a balloon inflator...

As odd as it may seem..... I spent some time in this profession

Worse yet, I did it dressed as a bear.

might explain my peculiar collecting habits.

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