Author Topic: Stanley nail hammers  (Read 28765 times)

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Offline Branson

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #15 on: July 13, 2014, 07:43:54 AM »
Remembering more, thanks to the ads you posted.  That red mahogany stain was on my grandfather's 2# ax.  The handle did break, and I replaced it but kept some of the handle to use for other handle projects.  So I have an original example of the stain to compare for the new handle on the hammer.

Offline scottg

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #16 on: July 13, 2014, 10:41:30 AM »
   I really liked the Atha/Stanley article. I poured over every word of it.
Thanks for sharing it with us.  It was a just treat.
  Cool Plumb ads too. Thanks

 So I couldn't help but notice you seem to be into factory handles?
  (I understand looking for the decals.) 
 
  I always ask this. Its nothing personal at all, I am just perpetually curious.

  The great legion (overwhelming majority) of tool collectors, all want factory work. Its factory work and factory paint and factory wood, that they all want.
     Value follows how exactly close the article still is, to factory work. Many times a flawless factory example commands a --very-- high price, when another tool of exactly the same age and construction, with only slight wear, is deemed worthless.
 
   There is such an extraordinary value on factory work, that people sometimes fake factory work.
  Great pains are extended to differentiate genuine minimum wage factory work from individual work.
   Why do you suppose that is?
 
  Have you personally ever worked in a factory?
  I have, and there is not a single solitary person in the the entire complex who really wants to be there.  In a word, its horrible. Its bad pay and bad conditions and high pressure to keep up production.
 Little good to be said of it at all, really.
 
    So why then, do so many people admire nothing else but factory work?
 Compared to even lightly skilled custom work, no factory ever came close to that skill level.  Custom work is often graced with high quality materials and elaborate, highly skilled decorative work.

  And yet, new condition factory work is the overwhelming favorite of most collectors.
          Why?
       
      yours Scott 
   
 

Offline jpaz

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #17 on: July 13, 2014, 12:19:02 PM »
   I really liked the Atha/Stanley article. I poured over every word of it.
Thanks for sharing it with us.  It was a just treat.
  Cool Plumb ads too. Thanks ..........
Thank you Scott - you are most welcome.

Quote
.......... So I couldn't help but notice you seem to be into factory handles? .......... The great legion (overwhelming majority) of tool collectors, all want factory work. Its factory work and factory paint and factory wood .......... And yet, new condition factory work is the overwhelming favorite of most collectors ...........
I am not a tool collector, Scott  - I have assembled a selection of hand tools that are representative of those I have owned and used (and cherished) during my lifetime. I have become a researcher of vintage hand tools and factory originality is of great importance in that endeavor. And I do personally like them that way. Not pristine, mind you, but just original configuration - labels and decals are not necessary, but they are a desirable nicety for me.

James
« Last Edit: July 13, 2014, 02:49:41 PM by jpaz »

Offline Art Rafael

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #18 on: July 13, 2014, 01:16:13 PM »
Very interesting and timely for me too.  I've been on a hammer kick lately since I took a commission to build some miniatures.  I am drawn to your pictures repeatedly, though framing hammers were requested and are nearly done.   Ralph

Offline jpaz

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #19 on: July 13, 2014, 08:11:23 PM »
Thanks very much for your contribution/s, jpaz!
     I learned long ago (I disremember exactly where/when, other than it was back in the late-'70s/early-'80s) to call your "Curved Claw Nail Hammer" a "crow-head hammer," and the rip-head a rip-head.  Any comment on this?
Thanks bear_man. When I was working in the trade we always called them "claw hammers" - "nail hammers" is the name Stanley identified them by in their catalogs. We didn't use any ripping hammers.

James

Offline jpaz

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #20 on: July 13, 2014, 08:15:50 PM »
Very interesting and timely for me too.  I've been on a hammer kick lately since I took a commission to build some miniatures.  I am drawn to your pictures repeatedly, though framing hammers were requested and are nearly done.   Ralph
Thanks Ralph. I hope you post some pics of your creations.

James

Offline rusty

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #21 on: July 14, 2014, 05:47:31 PM »
Stray bit...

I stumbled across an ad for Stanly hammers in Pop Sci, it shows an autobody hammer, with the atha logo on it. I didn't even know Stanley offered autobody hammers...

http://books.google.com/books?id=xSgDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA119
Just a weathered light rust/WD40 mix patina.

Offline jpaz

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #22 on: July 14, 2014, 09:47:04 PM »
Stray bit...

I stumbled across an ad for Stanly hammers in Pop Sci, it shows an autobody hammer, with the atha logo on it. I didn't even know Stanley offered autobody hammers...

http://books.google.com/books?id=xSgDAAAAMBAJ&pg=PA119
Rusty:  all 1930s and 1940s Stanley catalogs had fifty pages or so listing all kinds of tools and implements (including hammers) for the blacksmith, tinsmith, railroad maintenance, farrier, automotive repair, auotobody repair and machinist trades. Most of them bore ATHA markings as depicted in the ad you reference.

James
       

Offline mikeswrenches

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #23 on: July 15, 2014, 09:20:09 AM »
I have seen exactly one Stanley body hammer.  The typical round face on one end, and square face on the other.  I don't think it had an Atha mark on it...just Stanley.

They don't appear to be real common, certainly not like the Fairmounts, Bonney, Bluepoint, and Snap-on that I see.

Mike
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Offline Chillylulu

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #24 on: July 15, 2014, 10:41:24 AM »
Another great article!

Are you retired?  Would you mind sharing what you did, especially as it relates to those tools?

Chilly
« Last Edit: July 15, 2014, 05:49:13 PM by Chillylulu »

Offline Chillylulu

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #25 on: July 15, 2014, 11:06:10 AM »

  Have you personally ever worked in a factory?
  I have, and there is not a single solitary person in the the entire complex who really wants to be there.  In a word, its horrible. Its bad pay and bad conditions and high pressure to keep up production.
 Little good to be said of it at all, really.
 
    So why then, do so many people admire nothing else but factory work?
 Compared to even lightly skilled custom work, no factory ever came close to that skill level.  Custom work is often graced with high quality materials and elaborate, highly skilled decorative work.

  And yet, new condition factory work is the overwhelming favorite of most collectors.
          Why?
       
      yours Scott 
   

I can see both sides.  If you seriously collect anything the best you can get is the closest to the way it was as it came from the factory. It has a lot to do with rarity, but artistry, quality, verification of production methods, and focus.

I personally feel that there is a very wide range in quality when looking at vintage tools. Especially when compared to their modern equivalent. I won't even go into the difference between domestic products and tools manufactured elsewhere. Well, maybe a little, because some countries equal American products. But countries where quality is less important than price are prevalent.

So - factory fresh is rare and preferred by most when they can get it.

That being said, I'd rather have a Grandstaff handled tool on the wall than a factory handled equivalent regardless.  Your work is exceptional, most is not. Some looks good but the wood type is inappropriate. One-offs are hard to compare to other work in a price guide.  Most collectors aren't experts, but they are headed in that direction.

Ideally, I think a factory example with a ScottG (or equivalent) artist improved example is ideal.

Chilly

Offline jpaz

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #26 on: July 15, 2014, 06:38:46 PM »
Another great article!

Are you retired?  Would you mind sharing what you did, especially as it relates to those tools?

Chilly
Thank you Chilly. I have been retired (Industrial Engineer - Aircraft Manufacturing Systems) for some twenty five years now.

I was employed in the woodworking trade in the post WW2 1940s as a draftsman and an apprentice/craftsman truck cab and body builder - here is how: Building wooden flat bed truck bodies

James
« Last Edit: July 15, 2014, 07:47:08 PM by jpaz »

Offline Branson

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #27 on: July 18, 2014, 12:50:17 PM »
Well, James, thanks to you I now have a Plumb finishing hammer with an appropriately stained new handle.  Looks pretty.  In fact, it looked so good that I used the mahogany stain on a little farrier's hammer that was also looking too pale.


Offline jpaz

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #28 on: July 18, 2014, 11:43:33 PM »
Well, James, thanks to you I now have a Plumb finishing hammer with an appropriately stained new handle.  Looks pretty.  In fact, it looked so good that I used the mahogany stain on a little farrier's hammer that was also looking too pale.
Great stuff, Branson!

James

Offline Branson

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Re: Stanley nail hammers
« Reply #29 on: August 28, 2014, 07:40:52 PM »
Since I was taking pictures and making them fit with a program my step son added to my computer (and is teaching me how to use the thing),  here's a picture of the Plum hammer with its new, red mahogany stained handle.  Quite happy with it.  Beneath it is a 13 oz Stiletto that looks suspiciously similar.  Quite a pair, and they've earned permanent places on my work bench.